Effing Feline explain Christmas, part 2 #wewriwa

Photos: DepositPhotos

I, Effing Feline, find it tedious to explain things that every cat just knows. For example, opening presents. In Mr. H.’s house, Christmas wrappings come off with at least a modicum of decorum.  No one care about the paper so much — let ‘er rip! — but if there’s a nice bow or decoration, it must be saved at all costs. And that’s not the way to do it!

I’ll show you the proper, feline way to unwrap after this message from my sponsor, book 2 of Ed’s Passion Island Trilogy, entitled Pandora Uncaged.

Ember has joined a man named Tyler in the lava tube, i.e. a long, tunnel-like cave that the first colonists on planet Addoray had lived in. Here he shares a great discovery with her.

Tyler veered to his left then shone the flashlight at a grey, windowless structure that seemed wildly out of place here, yet so old he could imagine it nowhere else. Objectively speaking, it was just a small, utilitarian building nestled against the cave wall. Subjectively, it was a mystery and a miracle.

“Wow.” Ember’s voice was appropriately hushed in the face of antiquity. “This is old, a hundred years at least — absolutely prehistoric.”

Because of relativity, there could be no contact with Earth. The colonists had arrived here eighty years ago, and that was quite literally the Beginning of History. Old meant the colony’s early days, sixty or seventy years ago. Seven years of cold sleep on the ships had locked the door between Addorayans and prehistoric times—which meant Earth.

(and two more sentences)

To many people in Eastcott, Earth felt as distant as a mythical Garden of Eden that had expelled their ancestors for reasons unknown. A stereotypical Westerner—like Tyler?—believed Addoray was Paradise and Earth was a hell the ancestors had escaped because of moral and intellectual superiority.

Effing Feline here again. Here’s the cat way to open presents. Be sure to do it this way at your Christmas.

Be sure to visit the other great writers in Weekend Writing Warriors and Snippet Sunday. And remember — Merry Christmas to all and to all a good night!

Pandora Uncaged

Pandora Dayle is her family’s black sheep. She’s rebuilt her battered self-respect by working at an isolated facility for saving animals, but her redemption feels as fragile as a dream. She’ll be okay, though, if nothing traumatic happens.

But when the best friend from her innocent childhood arrives, her insecurities mushroom.

Aidan used to be Pandora’s best friend. As an adult, he’s been a policeman and now a Search and Rescue leader. He adored innocent young Pandora so much he judges every woman by her idealized memory . . . and finds them wanting.

But when he rediscovers the real thing, she’s not at all what he expected.

Booker, a naïve Apprentice Cupid for a secret organization, receives his second assignment: get Pandora and Aidan to mate. It should be easy, because they were best friends fifteen years ago. His strategy: Fly Aidan to her island and leave him there.

What could possibly go wrong?

36 comments

  1. Author Jessica E. Subject · · Reply

    I’m definitely curious about that building, and what it means for them.

    1. Let’s just say that the bulk of the book will happen inside the building, giving them a thorough chance to explore its mysteries.

  2. Mystery and miracle in the same sentence … can’t wait where this is heading.

    1. Well, you’re going to have to wait. Sorry about that, Iris!

  3. Kinda gives you the feeling of isolation being separated from the Earth of the past. And as for the unwrapping, I am wondering which style is the Effing method? From what we have learned so far, I am guessing there is much cleaning up to do when Effing gets his gifts.

    1. Effing, as you’ve rightly assumed, is a mess. Period.

  4. Thanks for the cat videos, Effing! I’ve missed them.

    Ed, you do a wonderful job setting the scene.

    1. Cat videos are always fun. Dog videos are, too, but there’s something about the puddytats that makes them almost more delightful in a video.

  5. Lol – prehistoric times. Love the concept. So accurate.
    Tweeted.

    Cats opening presents – tissue paper and catnip – makes a great mess and a happy cat.

    1. When I was a kid, I couldn’t imagine a time before I was born. Now, that’s easy . . . but what I can’t imagine is a time after I die. Funny how our perspective changes.

  6. nancygideon · · Reply

    Ha! My sons and grandguy still open presents that way. The cats are much neater.

    Love the way you describe this discovery, Ed, sneaking in backstory along with it.

    1. Describing the building’s looks in detail wouldn’t have been nearly as effective, IMHO, as describing the impression it makes on the characters.

  7. Enjoyed the initial details of the building. I bet there will be more in store as they venture deeper into it. Happy Holidays, Ed!

    1. Happy holidays to you, too, Frank.

  8. Effing is such fun!
    But your story sets a new perspective on prehistory.

    1. ‘Prehistory’, like more things, is in the eye of the beholder.

  9. A VERY cool snippet indeed. Can’t wait to read more of this story…I’m always fascinated by people rediscovering their past histories…great stuff!

    1. I know what you mean. Discovering my own ‘prehistory’ has certainly been fascinating. There are all these really cool family connections to events I’ve heard of, like WWI, and I have a tape of my Uncle Ed (who was pretty much a generation old than his brother, my dad) reminiscing about his childhood, when he knew his great-grandfather, who was born in the early 1800s. That blows my mind.

  10. Hmmm, maybe I’ll try the fang and claw method of opening gifts; seems like that kind of year.

    And according to this snippet, I’m approaching prehistoric. Not sure how I feel about that.

    1. Look at the bright side. To your kids and especially grandkids, you’ve always been prehistoric.

  11. Earth as prehistoric times. Love that imagery. Fun snippet. Have a very happy holiday.

    1. You have a great Christmas too, Sheri!

  12. That certainly brings perspective about age and history! I’m curious about what’s in that building.

    1. On a new colony world, where most of society’s energy is concentrated on exploration, infrastructure, and building, it makes sense people would have less time and, perhaps, interest in where they came from. Hence ‘prehistory’.

  13. Elaine Cantrell · · Reply

    I wonder what if any connection they’ll have to the building.

    1. There’re going to spend quite a bit of time in there . . . and make some new connections.

  14. Great imagery. Enjoyed the snippet and I’m curious to know more about the connection.

    1. Glad you enjoyed it, Karen.

  15. Very cool to have “prehistory” that’s only about 80 years ago. Kind of reminds me of the movie Passengers. Engrossing snippet!

    You should get video of Effing on Christmas morning and post that Ed. I bet that would be an eye-opener!

    1. The comparison to “Passengers” is very apt, although that ship’s hibernating passengers slept 120 years (I think) not 7. But yes; that period of time is a real inflexion point.

  16. It says a lot about their society that they’ve lost interest in their pre-colonial history after just a few generations.

    1. Such a small snippet can’t get across the subtleties. They haven’t lost interest so much as they’re too busy colonizing the planet. Also, the vast physical distance and the impossibility of returning to Earth create a huge psychological distance from the past.

  17. Excellent set-up for helping us understand the people of this world and their perceptions.
    ~Cie from Naughty Netherworld Press~

  18. I do love to do world-building.

  19. Interesting take on history. 🙂

    I LOVE the video!

    Happy New Year, Ed. I hope 2021 brings good things–including book success!

    1. Cat videos are almost always a hoot!

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